Schooner Vega / by Adam Lithner

Last summer in the middle of July I had the privilege to sail as a passenger with the schooner Vega for two weeks. It was during the Tall Ships Race across the Baltic sea. The tour, for my part, went from Stockholm to Helsinki and then to Riga where the actual race began.  

"...The sea has enabled contact between civilizations, and shipping has opened the way for trade between peoples. Every ocean has at one time been conquered by wooden sailing-ships. Vega was built in 1909 in Viken, Sweden. She is one of the last remaining ships from a thousand year old tradition of sailing ships that right up until the middle of the last century transported merchandise and supplies along our coasts. When these ships lost their economic interest they would have disappeared forever if certain enthusiasts had not realized the importance of preserving and making use of them. Vega was destined to be broken up at Finnboda shipyard in Stockholm in 1985. She was saved at the last minute thanks to Egil Bergström’s desire to pass our cultural heritage on to future generations. A large-scale restoration project was begun." - Quote taken from the official website: skonarenvega.se
















The purpose of my visit aboard this magnificent wooden ship was to take some great images that could turn useful for marketing. This was in no way planned in advance. In fact, I just happened to walk past the ship on a summers day and asked the people aboard if I could join somehow. I am very glad I did. The people aboard turned out to be the owners. They were an elderly couple who were very welcoming. They let me know everything there was to know about the history and customs of this particular vessel. They also let me know that that this ship has painstakingly been restored on their initiative alone. It is a truly remarkable story.

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